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Thursday, March 15, 2012

Keladi, the focal point.

Edible keladi is rarely regarded as beautiful, definitely not exotic. It's the smaller keladi with multi-coloured leaves that are very much sought after, always end up in pots, treasured by ladies. Once plants become source of food, they become very common, left in the field very much alone. That's how life goes.....

keladi = taro

So, our very common keladi really enjoyed the new space in a new setting. Seeds or tubers were all brought from Tanah Merah, our former place. 

Two types of Keladi. the smaller at far end, and the big ones.  13mac2012

KELADI, 15 jan 2012, 3 months old.



KELADI, 13 march 2012, 5 months old.
They were  planted five months ago, wait another month or two, they need to be harvested. Farmers in Kelantan mentioned about Keladi maturity starts after 6 months... But these keladi are real drinker. They really love soil to be wet and moist all the time.

bangchik and kakdah
Johor

10 comments:

  1. The large ones would definitely be exotic in this neck of the woods because it would be hard to give them enough water and good soil. I'm in awe of yours!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The large ones can grow with limited amount of water...., with smaller tuber.

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  2. learning from you once again...how widespread the growth of taro plants! I knew taro was grown in Africa (near water) and were considered quite a staple! I understand why yours require lots of water! I didn't know the greens could be eaten too...a wonderful plant for where there's plenty of water or irrigation!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We dont consume the leaves, only the stem and tuber. Mind you, not all keladi.... only some.

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  3. Your blog is really amazing with all the bits and pieces of information I can share with my friends and followers. Thanks and more power!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have no formal agriculture background. Both of us learn along the way.... with both ups and downs. I am glad, if the notes are of some use.

      Delete
  4. The big keladi look like "giant keladi"!
    Never planted them before. How you know that the tuber have matured? Kakdah have recipe for them ready? ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. when leaves start to dry out, it's time for harvest. I think she would slice them and fry or do sweet keladi porridge or bengkang/tepung talam (malay cuisine.

      Delete
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    ReplyDelete
  6. Salam..May I know what name of 2 type of the keladi..Where I can find it.It look beutiful and edible.Im really interested.can u email me at mdnosfera@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete

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