Thursday, June 14, 2012

Mahkota Dewa (Phaleria macrocarpa)

Trying to get healthier through herbs and fruits, is quite a recent thing. Over these years we are introduced to new plants proven beneficial to health. Most of them had in fact been grown and consumed without scientific endorsement by older generations. One of them is  Mahkota Dewa which is grown in my garden, originally a giveaway by Azmi in exchange of chili seedlings a couple of months ago.  I am trying to figure out what would be the eventual plant as it matures, how big would the flower be and the fruits. For the moment the plant is a foot height.


...........  my mahkota dewa  ...........



mahkota dewa

mahkota dewa


mahkota dewa




Mahkota Dewa (Macrocarpa phaleria)


(source:    Phaleria macrocarpa, The God's Crown - The Corroboree )

Mahkota Dewa (Macrocarpa phaleria) means 'God's Crown', a plant from the family of Thymelaeaceae. The name given to this fruit implies that it descends from heaven, as a benediction from divinity to help mankind. God's Crown is an indigenous plant from the island of Papua (Irian Jaya) located in the far east of the Indonesian archipelago. 

In Papua Nugini, which is situated in the east of Papua, more specifically in the area of Maprik about a 2.5 hour journey from the town of Wewak, a God's Crown tree was founded, about nine meters in height, bearing fruit on every branch. Some of the local residents when asked what Mahkota Dewa was used for, reported that the tree is only decorative and its fruit extremely poisonous. The same answer was given to another journalist from Kompas daily newspaper that happened to come across a similar tree in a village near Timika. It's quite ironic that the local people know nothing of this fruit that is currently being sourced by outsiders to heal many kinds of disease. 

Centuries ago samples of the Mahkota Dewa tree were once transported from the island of Papua by traditional Javanese medicine men and planted in the palace grounds of Solo and Jogyakarta. These men of wisdom had apparently developed a particular way of processing the poisonous fruit to make it a useful healing source. But knowledge of this medicine remained secret and age-old recipes were kept within the walls of the Javanese palaces for generations before news finally filtered out. The Javanese referred to this fruit as 'Makuto Dewo' and Chinese herbalists named it 'Pau', the patrimony drug. 

Now this plant is no longer the secret property of a wise circle of healers. Due to its economic value and medicinal benefits, many have started to cultivate the Mahkota Dewa in their home compounds. The tree grows with ease and does not require any special treatment or handling. It can grow in areas from 0 - 1000 meters above sea level; can reach 5 meters in height and effortlessly produces ample flowers that eventually develop as fruit.

After planting seeds it only takes one year before fragrant flowers appear that in due course transform into green coloured young fruit. In a maturing process the fruit then become a dazzling red tone in shapes that range from a ping-pong ball to apple size in appearance. For those not familiar with the Mahkota Dewa, its fruit can be quite alluring and flourishes within convenient reach all over the tree, down the trunk and the branch armpits.

The entire component of the crop, seeds, fruit, leaves and branches all contain medicinal properties. The Mahkota Dewa can be utilized as single drug and or mixed with other herbs to strengthen its effects and to neutralize its poison. Although Mahkota tastes rather sweet, it is most important to remember that it cannot be consumed direct or prior to medical processing. It is a highly poisonous plant that can be fatal. 

However, there is a certain technique to make it safe for traditional medicinal consumption. The immature green fruit as well as the ripened red fruit can be shredded and sun-dried. Take one tablespoon (no more) of this dried shredded flesh and mix it with a glass of boiling hot water to make a beverage infusion. It is believed that the flesh of the Mahkota Dewa fruit contains the anti-oxidant compounds that fight cancer. This is not recommended for pregnant women as consumption of this non-prescribed alternative medicine can endanger the unborn fetus. 

Mahkota Dewa is often used as a therapeutic healing alternative for an assortment of diseases. Healing time varies depending on the patient's body weight and severity of the ailment. A chronic disease such as cancer requires approximately eight months curing time with dosage is two tablespoons of dried shredded flesh in a glass of hot water. If the condition shows sign of improvement the dosage is lessened. 

Mahkota Dewa is believed to cure other diseases and health ailments such as high blood pressure, impotency, insomnia, influenza, rheumatism, allergies, heart disease, bladder complaints, uric acid and liver problems. However it is important that this traditional medicine is not consumed without prior consultation with a recommended herbalist. 

From www.theechomagazine.com 




mahkota dewa
(from: http://kantanmerah.blogspot.com/)

mahkota dewa
(from http://diansawong.multiply.com/)

mahkota dewa
(from http://linaherbs.blogspot.com)



i guess i have wait a year or two
to see the first fruit.


...............  bangchik and kakdah  ...............
johor










18 comments:

  1. Alamak rasa bersalah tengok posting ni. Pokok mahkota dewa saya mati sebab susuk bawah teduh dan saya travelling selalu masa tu. aduhai. Patutnya saya pindahkan ke tanah terus.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mama Pongkey..... perkara biasa dalam berkebun untuk tenguk hidup dan mati. Dah mati pokok, cari lain tanam semula.

      Delete
  2. I would be nervous about using something that is poisonous. I think I would purchase from a herbalist. It is great that you have herbalists. We have pharmacists. I think I would rather start by taking something natural.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mary Pellerito..... a skill indeed to treat poisonous fruits to something useful.

      Delete
  3. rasanya tak payah tunggu lama sangat kot. Sebab pakcik saya tanam tingginya baru sekaki lebih dah ada buah.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nudabuffy...... Tapi batang pokok kami kecik sangat, rasanya tak tertanggung beban buah tu nanti, kalau sekarang dia belajar nak berbuah.

      Delete
  4. oh that is interesting. The fruits are big and colorful and might tempt kids to get and eat, maybe it shouldn't be in very open accessible areas in populated countries like ours. Maybe it is seasonal, i've been to Solo and Jogyakarta, i wish i found it in their landscapes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Andrea..... Now I feel guilty growing mahkota dewa at the backyard. So everyone around here will be cautioned about the poisonous side of the fruits. I hope it is alright, keeping it and educating neighbours and visitors about the good and bad side of the fruits.

      Delete
  5. So far it's not poisonous since I've tried it. And the red big ants also love the mahkota dewa fruits. So, nothing to be afraid unless you eat it too much. With Allah's will...

    ReplyDelete
  6. GREEN PLATFORM........ thanks for the info. But neighbours has to be reminded about it's good and bad sides. Who knows kids might climb and eat too much of the appetizing colourful fruits.

    ReplyDelete
  7. This is new to me... the color of the fruit looks so good... thanks for sharing...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's new to me too.... the fruit look appetizing indeed!

      Delete
  8. Very nice site enjoyed it so far! Thanx for the comments!!!

    ReplyDelete
  9. This is so interesting! I hope one day this might find it's way to treat cancer in North America.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Medicines travel all over the world meeting patients. We are sure of that.

      Delete
  10. very good message

    ReplyDelete
  11. Where I can get seed of Mahkota Dewa.

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...