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Monday, October 26, 2009

the fate of marigolds after pruning


marigolds now quite bushy.

 

 
zinnias at the other end

 
Marigold buds against flowering zinnias

 

Soon yellow of marigolds
will blend
with pink of zinnia.


My little experiment on pruning marigolds waits for some interesting result. An earlier post on pruning is here ; Pruning marigolds at Walkway Bed  .  There are signs of marigolds ready to sprout the lovely yellow little blooms.  








~bangchik
Putrajaya Malaysia

13 comments:

  1. They are going to be beautiful when in bloom. It's so interesting to see plants that we grow as annual flourish year round.

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  2. They look so much better bushy. I look forward to seeing them flowering

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  3. They sure look happy to me. No marigolds in our garden as we have a wildlife friendly garden and marigolds demonstrate not much value to the wildlife especially the butterflies.

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  4. Why are marigolds not much value to wildlife? I need to know!!! Randy, you left me hannging.
    Bangchik, what marvelous foliage awaiting a superb bloom!
    Rosey

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  5. when you mentioned "fate" it sounded something bad had happened :-
    "Nasib pokok bunga selepas dicantas" but rather, it had given you a lovely surprise of beautiful flower buds.

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  6. I've been deadheading my marigolds and I've decided I really love the herbal smell they give off. You're right - they'll look spectacular with the zinnias!

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  7. When the blooms are out later... it would be an amazing sight to behold! Love the way you have a bed of marigolds. Makes a good impact!

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  8. marigolds are just great aren't they? So reliable, blooming forever, and great impact even to passersby. And to help with pests and deer resistent too, aren't they?

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  9. Bangchik, Marigolds are the kings of you garden right now. Give me the marigolds anytime. I just love their scent and flowers. They can self seed too.

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  10. I wish they blend well with zinnia. Its good to see that.

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  11. REBECCA, JOANNE, RANDY, ROSEY, JAMES, JGH, STEPH, WENDY, BELLE, MANIA,

    Thanks everyone for your visits and comments. I have been seeing marigolds planted in large numbers at various strategic locations in Putrajaya, the administrative capital of Malaysia.

    There is one at the start of the bridge towards Prime Minister's Office. There is another vintage point at the main entry route towards Putrajaya. Marigolds planted are short and of dwarf species with lots of flowers.

    But ours too tall for beauty and lack the compactness as with the dwarfs. When they get very lanky, there is strong possibility for them to topple after strong winds.

    Randy mentioned about marigolds being not too friendly for a wildlife friendly garden. To start with, snails and slugs had been eating many of the young marigolds, until I found a way around it. I notice small green grasshoppers make marigold bush as their home. These small creatures rest on the leaves within the foliage. I notice ants making regular trips to the top. So the whole marigold bush is quite a haven for wildlife. And I saw a tiny web there too once.

    Within the space constraint of our little garden, marigolds are well accepted as tolerable companions.

    But the next time, I wish to grow dwarf marigolds for a change!

    Cheers
    ~bangchik

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  12. I love the bushiness of the marigolds with little buds emerging from the top.

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  13. Mary Delle, the bushiness is not a permanent feature of marigolds. When the optimum height is reached, the plant get quite unstable... where a light push of strong wind will cause them to bend. Roots, soil structure, the height and the overall weight are important parameters for plant stability.

    I would be best not to let them grow too tall and heavy. A way is to feed less, water less, and probably allow leeway for them to grow and fend for themselves naturally.... The initial growth is definitely important and after a foot of growth, marigolds should be left alone.....

    Cheers
    ~bangchik

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