Monday, April 4, 2011

garden exotic flower wallpaper

One may wonder why should a flowering plant, so ordinary that it never end up in anybody's garden be considered exotic at all.  I am looking at the leaves, resembling fern or palm which we don't normally see on a climbing plant. I am looking at the indomitable spirit that pushes the exotic climber to keep on growing with new shoots at every available nodes.

This exotic climbing plant is from the old world, the days when children played in a make believe world with whatever around them. There were days, when little girls would take leaves of certain plant that will cause water to become thick almost like cooking oil. Little girls would use coconut shells to cook imaginary food that demand imagination to be stretched far and wide. Biscuits from clay, colourings from so many flowers wild or tame..., were props of childhood drama on stage.

This particular plant was everywhere when we were young. Some mothers would keep them in their little garden for dramatic red blooming fiesta. This exotic plant find it difficult to get to the modern world. Nobody wants them, too ancient I guess. Now I am giving them a chance of life time, for a glimpse of the modern world.




the leaves of exotic plant.
(Cardinal Vine updated)
    


leaves and buds
(Cardinal Vine updated)



leaves and buds
(cardinal Vine updated)

exotic plant on top of trellis, viewed from below
(Cardinal vine updated)

red exotic flower
(Cardinal Vine~updated)

(update: Cardinal Vine)
red exotic flower

I dont even know the name of this plant. I cant click its name from childhood pages. Possibly someone out there can recall, and give back its name...., before it is completely forgotten. We sometimes are guilty of pushing some native plants deep into oblivion.

(Update: Thanks Julie, the common name is Cardinal Vine)

bangchik and kakdah
Tanah Merah, Kelantan.

24 comments:

  1. What a lovely exotic plant for a little girl to imagine with...how kind to try to find the name of this beautiful plant before even its existence is forgotten! Do we lose our future when we lose our past?

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  2. Theanne and Baron
    The colour has adorned many little girl lips in yesteryears in their make believe world..... The other day I saw Kate Winslet in a movie putting on exactly the same colour tone for lipsticks. We cant duplicate the past of course, but at least we should redraw the blurry past before it is completely forgotten and deleted. Knowledge is timeless....

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  3. Bangchik i do not know what this plant is called in your language. I have only seen pictures of it in seed catalogs. It is called Cardinal Vine although Lipstick Vine would be a good name, too, judging from your pictures ; ) Ipomea multifida i think is the Latin name.
    I will probably plant this seed now and when it blooms i will be reminded of you. And so a new future is created for this plant ; )

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  4. Julie
    Thanks.... at least the plants now got their English name. Good luck to your attempt.

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  5. These plants are beautiful. The leaves are a very lush green.

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  6. I saw this plant before. They were treated like weeds in my childhood and i think i 'cooked' them before. Haha. The leaves are sexy.

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  7. Hi Bangchik, in our area it is also relegated as weeds because it is so viny and cling on anything near it. I also dont give much attention to it, we just cut and throw it away, but will somehow see them again next time. However, your first photo makes it very interesting for me now, haha! With proper guidance and trellis it will be nice. Julie is right, it is Cardinal Vine, but want to check the spelling of the scientific name: Ipomoea multifida (not Ipomea). thanks.

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  8. .....Folk Farm Daily
    They are beautiful. Being treated as weeds in some places, therefore these cardinal vines manage to look after themselves.

    ......milka
    What you have learned in the younger days with cooking must have developed your culinary skills today! Anybody you know grow this cardinal vine?

    ....Andrea
    To a certain extent they are invasive, yea with a gentle manner. Just look at the fine leaves, how would one consider such delicate leaves come from tough invasive vines. No thorns, so cardinal vines can be cleared quick. I checked, I think cardinal vine is Ipomoea quamoclit.

    ~bangchik

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  9. Hi Bangchik, glad to see this plant thriving again (at least in your garden) ^_^ Well done! ^_^ your pics really brighten up my days...Thanks ^_^

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  10. I remember the plant and flower from childhood... used to turn them into "sambal" when i was small.

    They look fragile and exotic... aren't they :D

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  11. What a lovely looking plant. Its delicate looks obviously belie its tenacity. I enjoyed the post and the comments above. Am pondering on the poetic and philosophical question from Theanne and Baron: do we lose our future when we lose our past?

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  12. ......tooey2010
    I am sorry, if displaying these ancient flowers of Malaysia hurts your childhood memories.. aha. They are lovely indeed!

    ......i amsterdam
    Sambal?..., children were adventurous with nature in the old days. I hope children of today can at least differentiate between ubi kayu and ubi keledek.

    ......catmint
    So delicate a plant and yet considered invasive in some place. It is assertive rather than aggressive, definitely not passive to display such gentle invasive demeanor. I am still pondering about Theanne and Baron last question. A painful question indeed as we glide on towards FUTURE.

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  13. I have not seen this plant for more than 20 yrs until i saw it in your post. It reminds me of the old days. As weed, she is not as lucky as the morning glories where ppl like me still buying seeds from the market to plant in the garden and have it dead headed everyday.. 2 different lifes. Ha.

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  14. ......milka
    Thanks, i guess it is alright to flip back through childhood years. It should fun to grow these. Soon I will do giveaways which will include cardinal vine.

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  15. What enchanting photos. Thank you :)

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  16. Patricia Tryon
    Thanks for dropping by.

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  17. My mother gave some seeds for this beautiful vine, and I plan to plant them once it warms up a bit. I think it is so beautiful with the beautiful red flowers and the feathery foliage.

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  18. Cool. Mystery solved. The internet is awesome.

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  19. The Sage Butterfly
    Cardinal vine will grow with minimal care.. good luck to you

    Jess
    Thanks.., it is good to share. That has been the trademark of gardeners.

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  20. I still occasionally grow cardinal vine in my garden. I'm always sad when someone asks, "What is that?" and when I tell them it's an annual vine they lose all interest.....

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  21. I have seen them when i was young too! They do really have a beautiful flower and leaves! You plant it from seed? where you bought?

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  22. These do look exotic. Like something you'd find in Hawaii. At least that's what it looks like to me.

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  23. ....... Kim and Victoria
    I am not sure how long will the plants last. They probably go beyond a year.. They are exotic!

    ....... Malar
    Seeds from MIL. I saw seeds forming already, so it wont be too long for another seeds giveaway.

    ....... ZZ
    Cardinal vines are forgotten climbers here. Not many are keen to grow them. Exotic, yes!

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  24. Oh okay. Thanks bangchik.

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