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Friday, August 14, 2009

Chilies looking for safe EXIT.

I never have chili plants continue to stay healthy after the first harvest. Leaves then begin to wrinkle. But the flowers continue to sprout everywhere. But I cant be expecting much from the second round of harvest... It doesn't matter much.

Pests or for the lack of nutrients or simply suffering from old age?


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Kakdah has already suggested a few vegetables to take over the space occupied by chilies . For now, we just let chili plants continue growing and soon will retire peacefully.

21 comments:

  1. Can plants suffer old age??? Hmmmm...interesting. You need to go leave a comment for Bilbo and hopefully he will come visit you! I would love that! The link to Down On the Allotment is on my page. Thanks

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  2. Thanks DIRT PRINCESS for the drop. I am looking at wrinkles ... at least that resembles old age. About Bilbo I just leave a comment asking Bilbo if they offer him Big Mac near Big Ben in London. He will get Pudding in Putrajaya if he is here.
    ~bangchik

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  3. I like Kakdah's idea even if through my experience in Hawaii, chilies plants kept growing and producing as if they were weeds. And I don't remember my father giving them any special fertilizer. Perhaps there is an insect pest that is the cause of the problem?

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  4. Bangchik, I experience the same problem. After the first round of harvest, my chilli plants bear lesser and lesser chilli until it dies off. Not enough chillis to cook curry.

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  5. Is it possible the chilli plants are suffering from the leaf curl virus attack?

    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6TC3-4KV3Y4J-4&_user=10&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view=c&_searchStrId=980017369&_rerunOrigin=google&_acct=C000050221&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=10&md5=bb463957a07bd1bb404a9538227afcbb

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  6. Just google pepper leaf curl virus (PepLCV) that causing devastating leaf curl disease of chilli (Capsicum annuum).

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  7. Hi Bangchik, I agree with vuejardin...think it is a virus. All plants must be removed and any leaves that have fallen also removed, do not compost. I might even be ready to remove the top layer of soil and add new. What a disappointment for you.

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  8. Hmmm interesting - our chili plant is also getting some wrinkled and slightly mottled leaves on the top... We thought it was just needing a little fertiliser or something.

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  9. This reminded me of my Euphorbia Mili plant. The leaves were all dried/curled up. They are now well rejuvenated from the heat. I give the plant more water and the leaves are no more curly. Have a wonderful day Bangchik and Kakdah!

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  10. Hi, I like your blog. I'm currently growing chilli from seeds and they are so slow.

    A friend who plants chilli told me to soak the seeds with salt water for a day before planting as it will help the fruit to stay on the plant and will kill whatever virus or sickness.

    I had just started sprouting "cilipadi" Hopefully it works.

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  11. vuejardin makes a good diagnosis with PepLCV, and I agree that looks like the most likely problem, but in case it isn't - is there any sign of spiders? webs etc? I spotted some small spots on the leaves, which made me think of spidermites

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  12. I had a problem like this last year with a few plants where vine weevils had laid eggs in the soil. they chomp away on all the roots and the plant has the look that it's water starved and shrivels because it is. Have you looked in the soil for grubs? If you have them, get rid of the soil (far away, nothing kills them).

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  13. > Rowena
    > Belle
    > Vuejardin
    > Janet
    > Julian
    > Steph
    > James
    > Ria
    > Barry

    Thanks for the drop. I appreciate the information on the likely reason for such wrinkled leaves. I really have to look up and start planning what to do next, with the chili plants and the soil. It could an early EXIT for my chilies....

    A nice day to you all...
    ~ bangchik

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  14. Same thing is happening to my peppers!

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  15. Love the photos! Thanks for sharing your chili progress!

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  16. PROSPERO, I guess some has to die early, like our chilies.

    JEANNE, nice of you to drop in. and thanks for the comments

    ~bangchik

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  17. It could be viral but it also could have to do with sun exposure or watering technique. Do you water by sprinkling over head? If you water down low and avoid getting the leaves wet it will prevent sun burns on the leaves. If it is viral, I would suggest not planting anything there for a while. Also, chillies are more prone to disease if they are planted in the same place over and over. Try rotating your plantings from year to year. I LOVE chillies so I do hope you don't give up on growing them.

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  18. JESSICA... I will consider shelving plans on chilies for a while... will concentrate on greens and beans til end of the year. Lets the viral thing subside and go away...
    ~bangchik

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  19. Can anyone tell me when I should harvest my chillies? Some are massive and more keep growing each time I look and are too small to pick. Im concerned about the weather getting colder. Any tips?

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