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Wednesday, June 23, 2010

what's so exotic about bittergourds

exotic

a bitter gourd hanging nicely

another bittergourd

the intricate design

the leaves

flower, partly hidden

tendrils

the little bitter gourd

the flower, so soft and delicate

The last post on bitter gourds was done on Monday, June 14, 2010 with the title 
Bitter gourds are blooming and fruiting.

Within a week, the fruits  really grow and take the shape and the look of a matured fruit. The whole look of the plant is very soft and delicate. The plant itself is lightweight, and resting on the trellis without any real pressure on the light bamboo frame. I am beginning to see the exotic nature of bitter gourds....
So far, pests has been shying away from the plant. The smell coming the plant is almost identical to marigolds and tomato.  We can walk blindfolded through the garden and can really recognize the smell coming bitter gourds. The aroma is exotic!


Once the fruit is ready to be plucked, 
I will do a post, 
and show the inside of a bitter gourd, the secret of its beauty,
definitely another glimpse of paradise.

bangchik

17 comments:

  1. Bitter gourd is very common in all of the Asian countries, that's where it belongs. Therefore, it should not be considered exotic in Malaysia.

    Your pictures make me hungry! :)

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  2. I can't wait to see what they look like on the inside. What an interesting plant.

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  3. Bangchik - I wonder if you could comment on my Roselle plant picture? I have a very healthy growing plant from seed and I was wondering how big it will get before it flowers?

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  4. Bitter gourd is bitter, but it is a very good food which helps to remove our "internal heat".

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  5. I have had to replant my bitter gourd recently. it just yellowed well before maturity. Wonder what happened? Only got 2 from the entire plant.

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  6. Somehow bittergourds taste good as soup, but yucky raw.

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  7. Bittergourd is full of nutrition! It taste good when fried with chili powder + tumeric +salt!

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  8. Helen Lewis ~ true, bitter gourds are natural here, but being exotic is something else. There are rare moments when we view plants differently, not just any other plants.... the beauty is delicate.

    Noelle ~ I have grown and eaten bitter gourds before, therefore very much aware what to expect. But the inside is unique..

    Matron ~ Glad to see Roselle growing so well in your garden. It is just a matter of time for it to bloom. Look at stalks armpit closely!

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  9. rainfield61 ~ Very true Rainnie, it cools the body down and helps diabetics.

    Keats The Sunshine Girl ~ Sorry to hear about your previous experience with bitter gourds. The soil should drain well....

    AaronVFT ~ I too find it difficult to eat raw... Fried like keropok is quite tasty too...

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  10. Malar ~ as long as we tolerate a bit of bitterness as we bite through the gourds, any menu with bitter gourds should be fairly tasty.

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  11. Looks like a wrinkled cucumber... One word - exotic. You, as always, was able to show the plant's beautiful sides.

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  12. Definitely exotic. Of course they would never grow here, so true in every sense of the word. The tendrils are Beautiful.

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  13. so fresh and hmmm bitter..:)

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  14. A uniquely exotic looking plant and beautiful in each stage.

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  15. I just am intrigued by your plants at their various stages of growth! It's so interesting!

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  16. Do you make paper bags to protect the bittergourd?

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  17. Tatyana@MySecretGarden ~ thanks, but beauty is very much in the eyes of the onlookers.

    Rebecca @ In The Garden ~ They are beautiful, even the tendrils which are their limbs clinging to anything they can grab.

    waliz ~ you are right about that bitter taste. But take that taste away, then it is no more bitter gourds. Distinctive taste indeed!

    Poetic Shutterbug ~ thanks..., beauty at every stage and at every part.

    Green Iris ~ yes, we miss the stages most of the time, focusing on the eventual produce.

    Ann ~ i don't put paper bags this time. I probably put them if insects find the bitter taste tolerable and start sniffing and biting...

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